What’s the Difference Between Editing and Proofreading?

What’s the Difference Between Editing and Proofreading?

What’s the Difference Between Editing & Proofreading?

What’s the difference between proofreading and editing?

I get asked this question a lot and figured it’s about time to provide a simple explanation between the two. Below I have provided a side by side comparison with bullet points to highlight the main differences between the two services.

TL;DR – Editing can improve the quality of your writing, whereas proofreading perfects already good writing, and ensures that it’s error free.

Editing includes proofreading by default and is typically more time-consuming.

Proofreaders don’t suggest significant changes to the text; rather, they look for minor text and formatting errors and confirm the material is ready for publication. Copy editing and proofreading are separate tasks, although the terms are sometimes used interchangeably by people who don’t know the difference.

Editing:

  • Errors and inconsistencies removed
  • Clearer expressions
  • Word-choice enhanced
  • Restructuring full paragraphs
  • Making sure the tone is correct for your audience
  • Improving the overall flow
  • Quality of writing improved
  • Maximum impact of writing achieved

Proofreading:

  • Spelling, grammar and punctuation mistakes fixed
  • Spruces up already good writing
  • Consistent language and formatting
  • Cheaper and less time-consuming than editing
  • Ensures publication-ready writing

When to choose between proofreading and editing?

Typically, if you’re a non-Native English speaker, a book author, requiring academic publication, or a business that depends on professionalism and projecting competence, editing should be your first choice.

If you have confidence that your writing is already cohesive or you’re a business that needs 100% mistake-free documents, then proofreading may be your best bet.

Editing and proofreading are different jobs and are designed for different stages of the revision process. Editing provides an opportunity to make your writing better, whilst proofreading is a final check to ensure perfection before publication.

 

Still unsure exactly what your writing needs?

Feel free to get in touch and send through your document for a free quote calculator and consultation.

 

Need help with editing, proofreading, or writing your English text?

What’s the Difference Between Editing and Proofreading?

What’s the Difference Between Editing and Proofreading?

What's the Difference Between Editing & Proofreading?What’s the difference between proofreading and editing? I get asked this question a lot and figured it’s about time to provide a simple explanation between the two. Below I have provided a side by side...

Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

ENGLISH LANGUAGE Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources There are thousands of people writing about learning English.   So, it’s no surprise at how easy it is to get lost in all the noise. I have broken down each resource into the respective areas of language...

What’s in a Name?

What’s in a Name?

FREELANCE WORK What's in a Name? When I hear a good idea for a business or product I immediately try and think of a name. I think it’s only natural. I’m having flashbacks to long road trips and spitballing brand names for quirky products my father and I would make up...

Joe’s English Café

Conceptual copywriting, editing, proofreading, voice recording, and translation services.

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Joe’s English Café

Conceptual copywriting, editing, proofreading, voice recording, and translation services.

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Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

ENGLISH LANGUAGE

Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

There are thousands of people writing about learning English.

 

So, it’s no surprise at how easy it is to get lost in all the noise. I have broken down each resource into the respective areas of language learning (grammar, speaking, writing, listening and reading) in the hope that you may find them useful as you embark on your language learning journey.

1.) Grammar

One of the best ways to learn grammar is through context. You might also hear that English grammar is pretty straightforward and has “rules.”

There are no rules in English, only guidance. Some guidance looks like a rule; it probably isn’t.

The fact is, English is full of nuances which require some explanation. That’s why I recommend using Grammarly.

It checks for more than 400 types of spelling, grammar, and punctuation errors, enhances vocabulary usage, and suggests citations.

It’s also an online grammar and spelling checker that improves communication by helping users find and correct writing mistakes.

2.) Speaking

How difficult can it be to find someone to practice speaking English with? Nothing beats face-to-face communication when it comes to learning English, but I think ELSA Speaks makes the list when it comes to improving pronunciation exercises + being motivated through the use of gamification.

TL;DR the link

Claim: The best way to learn English conversation

What does it let me do? Speak English in short, fun dialogues.

What does it do for me? Get instant feedback from proprietary artificial intelligence technology.

Feedback: Used over 40 million times and demonstrated amazing pronunciation improvements.

Award: Winner of SxSW’s Global Education Technology competition in 2016.

3.) Writing

Nowadays, people text. They use their thumbs more than any other part of their body. So writing seems a bit old-fashioned, right? Wrong. Keep a journal. The Life-Changing Habit of Journaling (Why Einstein, Leonardo da Vinci, and Many More Great Minds Recommend it)

…and what better way to get started than by practicing the 500 most commonly used words in the English Language.

4 & 5.) Listening and Reading

One of the most common things I’ve heard is that listening comes first when learning a new language. So, if you’re a movie fan such as myself I’d suggest Netflix with subtitles to start associating sounds to letters.

4 Ways to Use Netflix for Language Learning

  1. Search for content in your target language.
  2. Change content into your target language.
  3. Change the subtitles into the target language.
  4. Watch a foreign show with subtitles in the target language.

And for those interested in ESL discussion material based on TED Talks. Check out TEDxESL.com. There are printable transcripts from the talks.

Quizzes

For creating quizzes, Typeform.com is excellent and we highly recommend it! Make sure to check out the Vocabulary Quiz, English Language Level, and E-learning English Course.

 

Need help with editing, proofreading, or writing your English text?

What’s the Difference Between Editing and Proofreading?

What’s the Difference Between Editing and Proofreading?

What's the Difference Between Editing & Proofreading?What’s the difference between proofreading and editing? I get asked this question a lot and figured it’s about time to provide a simple explanation between the two. Below I have provided a side by side...

Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

ENGLISH LANGUAGE Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources There are thousands of people writing about learning English.   So, it’s no surprise at how easy it is to get lost in all the noise. I have broken down each resource into the respective areas of language...

What’s in a Name?

What’s in a Name?

FREELANCE WORK What's in a Name? When I hear a good idea for a business or product I immediately try and think of a name. I think it’s only natural. I’m having flashbacks to long road trips and spitballing brand names for quirky products my father and I would make up...

Joe’s English Café

Conceptual copywriting, editing, proofreading, voice recording, and translation services.

Follow Us

Joe’s English Café

Conceptual copywriting, editing, proofreading, voice recording, and translation services.

Follow Us

My Editing Process Broken Down

My Editing Process Broken Down

FREELANCE WORK

My Editing Process Broken Down

Not all editing jobs are the same. They all come with their own unique set of requirements, whether it be fixing sentence structure, changing intent, and meaning, rewriting an entire paragraph, or subbing out unnatural sounding words rarely used for a more contemporary vernacular.

The other day I received a WeChat message from a client. “Hello, Joe! Can you edit this document for me?” [Word Doc Attached] The first thing I do is open the document, save a copy to my desktop and always check the box “Maintain compatibility with previous versions of Word.”

I check the word count and calculate the time it’ll take to complete and how much it’ll cost. I offer a competitive price of $0.01/word to edit. Although, this price differs depending on the uniqueness of the job.

I then find that there are direct translations from Chinese to English and after doing a scan through the document I’m already finding mistakes. My OCD is kicking in. I open up Google Translate and paste in the Chinese. The translations aren’t 100% either, and I compare the original translations to the new ones. I find a better way to convey the meaning of the writing and make “Track Changes” to show my edits.

Word after word, sentence after sentence, paragraph after paragraph. I work small to large to piece together the newly edited content cohesively. Now it sounds better, and I feel my OCD subsiding.

The last step is putting the newly written English text through Grammarly to iron out any mistakes. It’s always good to have AI/machine learning tools at your fingertips.

An essential part of editing/proofreading when dealing with my clients is communication. I like to understand context; who the audience is and what kind of goals you want to achieve with your writing is essential.

 

Is your writing casual? Academic? Business? Technical? Creative?

Are you trying to inform? Describe? Convince? Tell a story?

Is your audience general? Knowledgeable? Experts? And is your writing formal or informal?

All of these factors help with the editing process, and a great tool to use is Grammarly. Grammarly Insights offers a way to check off these factors to provide better advice on what to fix. I think it’s also important to note that Grammarly isn’t a cure-all solution. It isn’t 100% perfect and still requires human input. Overall, it’s a tool and is used as such.

Grammarly lets you find unique and rare words that speak volume and add depth. Also, it identifies words that are not amongst the most common 5,000 English words and improves readability by targeting:

– Word length
– Sentence length
– Audience knowledge with the Flesch reading-ease text score.

TL;DR: My process is mainly to use a combination of Word, Google Translate, a manual comparison between old and potentially new text, after making revisions pass through Grammarly to do a final sweep to catch any potential mistakes. Save and send.

 

Need help with editing, proofreading, or writing your English text?

What’s the Difference Between Editing and Proofreading?

What’s the Difference Between Editing and Proofreading?

What's the Difference Between Editing & Proofreading?What’s the difference between proofreading and editing? I get asked this question a lot and figured it’s about time to provide a simple explanation between the two. Below I have provided a side by side...

Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

ENGLISH LANGUAGE Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources There are thousands of people writing about learning English.   So, it’s no surprise at how easy it is to get lost in all the noise. I have broken down each resource into the respective areas of language...

What’s in a Name?

What’s in a Name?

FREELANCE WORK What's in a Name? When I hear a good idea for a business or product I immediately try and think of a name. I think it’s only natural. I’m having flashbacks to long road trips and spitballing brand names for quirky products my father and I would make up...

Joe’s English Café

Conceptual copywriting, editing, proofreading, voice recording, and translation services.

Follow Us

Joe’s English Café

Conceptual copywriting, editing, proofreading, voice recording, and translation services.

Follow Us