What’s the Difference Between Editing and Proofreading?

What’s the Difference Between Editing and Proofreading?

What’s the Difference Between Editing & Proofreading?

What’s the difference between proofreading and editing?

I get asked this question a lot and figured it’s about time to provide a simple explanation between the two. Below I have provided a side by side comparison with bullet points to highlight the main differences between the two services.

TL;DR – Editing can improve the quality of your writing, whereas proofreading perfects already good writing, and ensures that it’s error free.

Editing includes proofreading by default and is typically more time-consuming.

Proofreaders don’t suggest significant changes to the text; rather, they look for minor text and formatting errors and confirm the material is ready for publication. Copy editing and proofreading are separate tasks, although the terms are sometimes used interchangeably by people who don’t know the difference.

Editing:

  • Errors and inconsistencies removed
  • Clearer expressions
  • Word-choice enhanced
  • Restructuring full paragraphs
  • Making sure the tone is correct for your audience
  • Improving the overall flow
  • Quality of writing improved
  • Maximum impact of writing achieved

Proofreading:

  • Spelling, grammar and punctuation mistakes fixed
  • Spruces up already good writing
  • Consistent language and formatting
  • Cheaper and less time-consuming than editing
  • Ensures publication-ready writing

When to choose between proofreading and editing?

Typically, if you’re a non-Native English speaker, a book author, requiring academic publication, or a business that depends on professionalism and projecting competence, editing should be your first choice.

If you have confidence that your writing is already cohesive or you’re a business that needs 100% mistake-free documents, then proofreading may be your best bet.

Editing and proofreading are different jobs and are designed for different stages of the revision process. Editing provides an opportunity to make your writing better, whilst proofreading is a final check to ensure perfection before publication.

 

Still unsure exactly what your writing needs?

Feel free to get in touch and send through your document for a free quote calculator and consultation.

 

Need help with editing, proofreading, or writing your English text?

What’s the Difference Between Editing and Proofreading?

What’s the Difference Between Editing and Proofreading?

What's the Difference Between Editing & Proofreading?What’s the difference between proofreading and editing? I get asked this question a lot and figured it’s about time to provide a simple explanation between the two. Below I have provided a side by side...

Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

ENGLISH LANGUAGE Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources There are thousands of people writing about learning English.   So, it’s no surprise at how easy it is to get lost in all the noise. I have broken down each resource into the respective areas of language...

What’s in a Name?

What’s in a Name?

FREELANCE WORK What's in a Name? When I hear a good idea for a business or product I immediately try and think of a name. I think it’s only natural. I’m having flashbacks to long road trips and spitballing brand names for quirky products my father and I would make up...

Joe’s English Café

Conceptual copywriting, editing, proofreading, voice recording, and translation services.

Follow Us

Joe’s English Café

Conceptual copywriting, editing, proofreading, voice recording, and translation services.

Follow Us

Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

ENGLISH LANGUAGE

Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

There are thousands of people writing about learning English.

 

So, it’s no surprise at how easy it is to get lost in all the noise. I have broken down each resource into the respective areas of language learning (grammar, speaking, writing, listening and reading) in the hope that you may find them useful as you embark on your language learning journey.

1.) Grammar

One of the best ways to learn grammar is through context. You might also hear that English grammar is pretty straightforward and has “rules.”

There are no rules in English, only guidance. Some guidance looks like a rule; it probably isn’t.

The fact is, English is full of nuances which require some explanation. That’s why I recommend using Grammarly.

It checks for more than 400 types of spelling, grammar, and punctuation errors, enhances vocabulary usage, and suggests citations.

It’s also an online grammar and spelling checker that improves communication by helping users find and correct writing mistakes.

2.) Speaking

How difficult can it be to find someone to practice speaking English with? Nothing beats face-to-face communication when it comes to learning English, but I think ELSA Speaks makes the list when it comes to improving pronunciation exercises + being motivated through the use of gamification.

TL;DR the link

Claim: The best way to learn English conversation

What does it let me do? Speak English in short, fun dialogues.

What does it do for me? Get instant feedback from proprietary artificial intelligence technology.

Feedback: Used over 40 million times and demonstrated amazing pronunciation improvements.

Award: Winner of SxSW’s Global Education Technology competition in 2016.

3.) Writing

Nowadays, people text. They use their thumbs more than any other part of their body. So writing seems a bit old-fashioned, right? Wrong. Keep a journal. The Life-Changing Habit of Journaling (Why Einstein, Leonardo da Vinci, and Many More Great Minds Recommend it)

…and what better way to get started than by practicing the 500 most commonly used words in the English Language.

4 & 5.) Listening and Reading

One of the most common things I’ve heard is that listening comes first when learning a new language. So, if you’re a movie fan such as myself I’d suggest Netflix with subtitles to start associating sounds to letters.

4 Ways to Use Netflix for Language Learning

  1. Search for content in your target language.
  2. Change content into your target language.
  3. Change the subtitles into the target language.
  4. Watch a foreign show with subtitles in the target language.

And for those interested in ESL discussion material based on TED Talks. Check out TEDxESL.com. There are printable transcripts from the talks.

Quizzes

For creating quizzes, Typeform.com is excellent and we highly recommend it! Make sure to check out the Vocabulary Quiz, English Language Level, and E-learning English Course.

 

Need help with editing, proofreading, or writing your English text?

What’s the Difference Between Editing and Proofreading?

What’s the Difference Between Editing and Proofreading?

What's the Difference Between Editing & Proofreading?What’s the difference between proofreading and editing? I get asked this question a lot and figured it’s about time to provide a simple explanation between the two. Below I have provided a side by side...

Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

ENGLISH LANGUAGE Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources There are thousands of people writing about learning English.   So, it’s no surprise at how easy it is to get lost in all the noise. I have broken down each resource into the respective areas of language...

What’s in a Name?

What’s in a Name?

FREELANCE WORK What's in a Name? When I hear a good idea for a business or product I immediately try and think of a name. I think it’s only natural. I’m having flashbacks to long road trips and spitballing brand names for quirky products my father and I would make up...

Joe’s English Café

Conceptual copywriting, editing, proofreading, voice recording, and translation services.

Follow Us

Joe’s English Café

Conceptual copywriting, editing, proofreading, voice recording, and translation services.

Follow Us

What’s in a Name?

What’s in a Name?

FREELANCE WORK

What’s in a Name?

When I hear a good idea for a business or product I immediately try and think of a name. I think it’s only natural. I’m having flashbacks to long road trips and spitballing brand names for quirky products my father and I would make up on the spot.

A fun game yes, but it can be quite serious for your business. Others view it more of a difficult task because there are quite literally hundreds of thousands of names that already exist, so the pickings are slim. This post will cover different techniques and examples of how to give your business a memorable name.

Your brand’s mission statement and vision should be the anchor for how you frame your brand name. It should be based on this to help jog your audience’s memory of what you are and what you do. All packaged nice and neatly into a single name. A viral concept.

What story does your name tell? Saying more with less is a tough task, but I tend to follow a system or approach to brand naming that has helped me in the past.

Finding keywords is important and usually the first step. Make a list of these, they’ll come in handy as you grow your lexicon for suitable names.

After exhausting my vocabulary or if I haven’t had enough coffee I turn to the all so reliable Thesaurus. Remember that list you just made? Take all possible combinations of words from that list and enter them into a Thesaurus to expand your lexicon.

Some words will stand out more than others and it’s your job to whittle down and decide which ones are not going to be used. The most annoying is trying to find that right word but it doesn’t exist. I swear, the English language doesn’t have enough words sometimes.

Moving on, now that you’ve found relevant words that can potentially be your brand name, how do you go about picking the right one, or two, or three?

This post will go over not just where to find resources, tools, and inspiration for building a brand name, but also different techniques for naming your brand by yourself.

Ever wondered why companies like Apple, Uber, and Airbnb are so easily identified in a sea of advertising? Jonathan Bell gives step-by-step advice on how to create a lasting brand name. 

 

TL;DW (Too lazy, didn’t watch) In the talk, he mentions 7 different categories of names when you need to first select the type of name you want.

Eponymous like Disney, Adidas, and Tesla.
Descriptive like American Airlines and Home Depot.
Acronymic like GE, KFC, HSBC, and BP
Suggestive which has 3 subcategories – Real like Uber and Slack, Composite like Facebook and Ray-Ban and Invented like Kleenex and Pinterest.
Associative like Amazon, SiriusXM, and Red Bull.
Non-English like Samsung, Lego, Zappos, and Hulu.
Abstract like Rolex and Kodak.

So now that you know the 7 basic categories your company name could fall under, let’s go into the details about the methodology of creating a unique name.

Turning your name into something special.

Letter changing. This includes switching letters with numbers, rearranging, swapping, omitting, sharing and even adding letters for added uniqueness.

There are many companies out there that have employed the letter changing, omission or addition technique into their brand name. For example, Lyft changes 1 letter, Grabr omits letters and sites like Awwwards and Dribbble didn’t accidentally sit on their keyboard.

Uniqueness eventually trains familiarity.

It is this difference that piques people’s curiosity and brand names become sticky over time. We as humans do not read entire words. We’re lazy. Instead, we tend to skip over the middle part of a word and look at the first and last letters. I’m sure you’ve seen this example floating around the ether before:

Tihs is bucseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey ltteer by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. Aaznmig, huh? Yaeh and I awlyas tghhuot slelinpg was ipmorantt!

Now, I’m not saying go out there and give your company a name that’s blatantly misspelled. Part of the reason we can decipher the message above is due to the surrounding words putting each word into context. Your name should focus on context and instill new found meaning around your concept.

When I go to type in my favorite web design sites for inspiration I’m trained to add those extra “w’s” when typing awwwards.com. I know there are exactly 3 and when I tell people about the site it is something that sticks out and warrants discussion. What does it mean? Oh ya, 3 w’s for www. , it’s a site about websites, clever. And I’m stretching here but what about the thunderous sound of “aaa!” When witnessing something amazing or receiving an award for a beautiful website. I’m not sure that was their intention but it does make users curious, and most importantly thinking or talking about said name.

When considering using fewer letters or swapping them for a similar sounding letter, the phonetic spelling of the word can add a different perspective and feel. For example, I wanted to create a travel-related brand but was having trouble coming up with other names separate from the cliche “wanderlust, traveller, nomad, jet-setter, voyager, etc.”. But when playing around with the spelling and phonetics, alternative forms of the words stuck out for added uniqueness.

Voyage became Voyij, Traveller became Trvlr, Journey became Journi, and since I wanted to settle on a combination of work and travel, WorkWanders seemed appropriate. The added layer of puns, purposeful word mix-ups and using more than 1 word can help describe your concept on a deeper, more in-depth level.

How do you come up with a brand name?

Need help with editing, proofreading, or writing your English text?

What’s the Difference Between Editing and Proofreading?

What’s the Difference Between Editing and Proofreading?

What's the Difference Between Editing & Proofreading?What’s the difference between proofreading and editing? I get asked this question a lot and figured it’s about time to provide a simple explanation between the two. Below I have provided a side by side...

Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

ENGLISH LANGUAGE Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources There are thousands of people writing about learning English.   So, it’s no surprise at how easy it is to get lost in all the noise. I have broken down each resource into the respective areas of language...

What’s in a Name?

What’s in a Name?

FREELANCE WORK What's in a Name? When I hear a good idea for a business or product I immediately try and think of a name. I think it’s only natural. I’m having flashbacks to long road trips and spitballing brand names for quirky products my father and I would make up...

Joe’s English Café

Conceptual copywriting, editing, proofreading, voice recording, and translation services.

Follow Us

Joe’s English Café

Conceptual copywriting, editing, proofreading, voice recording, and translation services.

Follow Us

My Editing Process Broken Down

My Editing Process Broken Down

FREELANCE WORK

My Editing Process Broken Down

Not all editing jobs are the same. They all come with their own unique set of requirements, whether it be fixing sentence structure, changing intent, and meaning, rewriting an entire paragraph, or subbing out unnatural sounding words rarely used for a more contemporary vernacular.

The other day I received a WeChat message from a client. “Hello, Joe! Can you edit this document for me?” [Word Doc Attached] The first thing I do is open the document, save a copy to my desktop and always check the box “Maintain compatibility with previous versions of Word.”

I check the word count and calculate the time it’ll take to complete and how much it’ll cost. I offer a competitive price of $0.01/word to edit. Although, this price differs depending on the uniqueness of the job.

I then find that there are direct translations from Chinese to English and after doing a scan through the document I’m already finding mistakes. My OCD is kicking in. I open up Google Translate and paste in the Chinese. The translations aren’t 100% either, and I compare the original translations to the new ones. I find a better way to convey the meaning of the writing and make “Track Changes” to show my edits.

Word after word, sentence after sentence, paragraph after paragraph. I work small to large to piece together the newly edited content cohesively. Now it sounds better, and I feel my OCD subsiding.

The last step is putting the newly written English text through Grammarly to iron out any mistakes. It’s always good to have AI/machine learning tools at your fingertips.

An essential part of editing/proofreading when dealing with my clients is communication. I like to understand context; who the audience is and what kind of goals you want to achieve with your writing is essential.

 

Is your writing casual? Academic? Business? Technical? Creative?

Are you trying to inform? Describe? Convince? Tell a story?

Is your audience general? Knowledgeable? Experts? And is your writing formal or informal?

All of these factors help with the editing process, and a great tool to use is Grammarly. Grammarly Insights offers a way to check off these factors to provide better advice on what to fix. I think it’s also important to note that Grammarly isn’t a cure-all solution. It isn’t 100% perfect and still requires human input. Overall, it’s a tool and is used as such.

Grammarly lets you find unique and rare words that speak volume and add depth. Also, it identifies words that are not amongst the most common 5,000 English words and improves readability by targeting:

– Word length
– Sentence length
– Audience knowledge with the Flesch reading-ease text score.

TL;DR: My process is mainly to use a combination of Word, Google Translate, a manual comparison between old and potentially new text, after making revisions pass through Grammarly to do a final sweep to catch any potential mistakes. Save and send.

 

Need help with editing, proofreading, or writing your English text?

What’s the Difference Between Editing and Proofreading?

What’s the Difference Between Editing and Proofreading?

What's the Difference Between Editing & Proofreading?What’s the difference between proofreading and editing? I get asked this question a lot and figured it’s about time to provide a simple explanation between the two. Below I have provided a side by side...

Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

ENGLISH LANGUAGE Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources There are thousands of people writing about learning English.   So, it’s no surprise at how easy it is to get lost in all the noise. I have broken down each resource into the respective areas of language...

What’s in a Name?

What’s in a Name?

FREELANCE WORK What's in a Name? When I hear a good idea for a business or product I immediately try and think of a name. I think it’s only natural. I’m having flashbacks to long road trips and spitballing brand names for quirky products my father and I would make up...

Joe’s English Café

Conceptual copywriting, editing, proofreading, voice recording, and translation services.

Follow Us

Joe’s English Café

Conceptual copywriting, editing, proofreading, voice recording, and translation services.

Follow Us

Putting Out Fires Left & Right!

Putting Out Fires Left & Right!

FREELANCE WORK

Putting Out Fires Left & Right

Umbrella in hand. Trying not to get soaked anymore than I already had. Winters in Shanghai can be rough, especially when you’re fighting for a spot on the metro. The city will change you and like the saying goes, “if you can’t beat em, join em!”.

Being an English teacher is introspective. I never realized just how many unique and specific idioms there were. This is part of being a native English speaker that is difficult to convey as a teacher to non-Native speaking students. A level of authenticity, and when used properly, a saying can really add “flavor” to a language, and not just in English, but any language for that matter.

I was on my way to tutor ‘Xinwen.’ He was a mid-20s businessman who worked in IT just over in the next neighborhood from my apartment. I had been teaching him phrases and day-to-day English that would be useful around the office and dealing with clients.

“What’s up Xinwen?” “How are you doing?”

“Oh you know, same old same old. Just putting out fires left and right today!”

“Oh man, that sounds rough! Well, this part of the day isn’t too bad though, huh!?”

“Oh yeah, learning English is the best!” (Some tone of sarcasm in there, I can sense it!) [Both laughing]

Over the years spent teaching adults, I found it to be really entertaining and fun. A broader range of topics could be covered, and as my students learned from me, I learned from them. But one thing was constant. I kept getting odd, one-off tasks.

I’d check my WeChat in the evening, and my phone would blow up with messages from students and friends or students.

“Can you check my emails for any mistakes?”

“This marketing report needs to go out tomorrow, can you give it a look?”

“Why are there spaces next to paragraphs?”

“Should I say best regards or kind regards?

As the questions piled on, I realized that people just wanted clarity and answers that couldn’t be found on Google or Baidu. They also had the mounting pressure of working at International companies and English was a must. Instead of scheduling a lesson, commuting to a local Starbucks, and spending time together practicing English things became more and more remote.

Skip forward 5 years, and I’m sitting in a cafe in Hoi An, Vietnam. I’ve just gotten a few new tasks today. I mainly use UpWork and Joe’s English Cafe to get in touch with people who need help with their English content. The jobs have been interesting to say the least. To name a few gigs I’ve gotten in the past:

  • Mediterranean Cruise travel itinerary editing
  • Writing a Facebook post for finding a lost dog in Sweden (they found her)
  • Creating numerous variations of questions to be asked by guests to a hotel concierge robot in Japan
  • Editing a new Uber-like service description launching in Pakistan
  • Making product descriptions sound more natural. Products included: e-cigs, electric toothbrushes, rice wine, home workout elastic bands, and squishy toys
  • Writing up area reports for a new neighborhood development in Ontario
  • Transcribing engineering YouTube videos for a Vietnamese client
  • Editing a dentist webpage based in Hungary
  • Editing and proofreading a thesis on AI & Machine Learning for a student in Sydney
  • Editing UI/UX design presentations for a new freelancing website in Russia
  • Translating Chinese to English for a children’s book about different vegetables and fruits
  • Editing a report on Hainan Airlines in Malaysia

 

 

“I mainly use UpWork and Joe’s English Cafe to get in touch with people who need help with their English content.”

These are just a few jobs and as time has gone by I’ve been looking to expand. If you’re interested in working together feel free to get in touch! And if you’re looking for a second pair of eyes to edit or proofread your English content, let’s put these fires out together!

Need help with editing, proofreading, or writing your English text?

What’s the Difference Between Editing and Proofreading?

What’s the Difference Between Editing and Proofreading?

What's the Difference Between Editing & Proofreading?What’s the difference between proofreading and editing? I get asked this question a lot and figured it’s about time to provide a simple explanation between the two. Below I have provided a side by side...

Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources

ENGLISH LANGUAGE Top 5 (Free) English Language Resources There are thousands of people writing about learning English.   So, it’s no surprise at how easy it is to get lost in all the noise. I have broken down each resource into the respective areas of language...

What’s in a Name?

What’s in a Name?

FREELANCE WORK What's in a Name? When I hear a good idea for a business or product I immediately try and think of a name. I think it’s only natural. I’m having flashbacks to long road trips and spitballing brand names for quirky products my father and I would make up...

Joe’s English Café

Conceptual copywriting, editing, proofreading, voice recording, and translation services.

Follow Us

Joe’s English Café

Conceptual copywriting, editing, proofreading, voice recording, and translation services.

Follow Us